How To Find A Persian Cat A Home?


“Where can I take my cat to be rehomed?”

If you are looking for a new home for your cat, you may want to start by asking your veterinarian for recommendations. It’s possible that he or she is acquainted with someone who might be interested in adopting your cat or cats. Inquire at the animal shelter in your community whether they have been approached by anybody interested in adopting a Persian or Himalayan cat.

Posters containing a photo of your cat, a description of its personality, its age, and how to get in touch with you should be displayed at your veterinarian’s office as well as any other local veterinarians’ offices. Conduct in-depth interviews with prospective adoptive parents and want payment for the privilege.

Insist that the cat will only live inside its whole life. Make sure that the cat has been spayed or neutered BEFORE it is introduced to its new family. It is not a good idea to just give away your cat due to the fact that research facilities make use of cats in the experimental studies and that some individuals teach their dogs to murder.

It should come as no surprise that the ideal environment for a cat is to remain in the same house it has always called home and to spend time with the people it loves.

If you MUST rehome your cat, follow the guide below:

Where did you get the cat?

If you purchased your cat from a Breeder…You should contact your breeder first.

Any breeder worth their salt would gladly accept their cats back. Often, people would ask why a breeder would take a cat-back that’s already neutered, or not breedable. A successful breeder is about more than simply making money. She has vowed to take care of her kitties for the rest of her life and is concerned about their well-being. She will frequently have a waitlist of great homes who would be thrilled to take on your kitty! There is a chance that the CFA purebred Rescue can provide you with assistance.
If you adopted your cat from a Rescue organization…Check the terms of your agreement.

Many people who helped the cat insist on having it returned to them.
If you adopted from an Animal Shelter…Please do NOT return the cat to them!
If you found the cat as a stray cat…You are going to have to jump through a few legal hoops if you want to give the cat’s owners an opportunity to get their pets back, but it will be worth it.

The most effective method for locating the cat’s owners is to place advertisements in the local media, as well as fliers in the surrounding area, at animal shelters, and at the offices of local veterinarians.

PLEASE DO NOT take the cat to any shelter that has a history of having a large number of animals put to death. Take it exclusively to those named on this list. An animal shelter is not a secure location for a stray cat, particularly a Persian. Because of the high prevalence of infectious illnesses at the shelter, there is a good chance that this cat will be put down. The shelter must keep the cat for at least 4 days, and even if Rescue can accept it, the animal may be extremely unwell by the time we receive it.

The majority of animal shelters do almost no adoption screening, which means that whoever shows up first with their adoption money wins the cat, regardless of whether or not they have a suitable home. After you have completed the necessary procedures, you should refer to the instructions that are provided further down the page in order to securely place the cat.

First Step:

If you are looking for a new home for your cat, you may want to start by asking your veterinarian for recommendations. They could know someone who is interested in giving your pet a forever home. Posters containing a photo of your cat, a description of its personality, its age, and how to get in touch with you should be displayed at your veterinarian’s office as well as any other local veterinarians’ offices. Conduct in-depth interviews with prospective adoptive parents and want payment for the privilege.

It is not a good idea to just give away your cat due to the fact that research facilities utilize cats in experimental studies and that some individuals use cats to teach canines to kill. Be careful to ask for permission before calling the prior owner’s veterinarian to verify that they have been truthful with you about the care they have provided to their cats in the past. Screening should be done carefully!

Second Step:

There are organizations that are expressly here to help Persians who are going through a crisis. Please contact them if you are able to. They provide therapy for difficulties relating to the litter box, behavioral concerns, Persian-specific health queries, and references to veterinarians in the region who are knowledgeable about Persians. Foster homes are available, but only on a very limited basis. You also have the option of putting your cat’s name on a waiting list for a foster home. Since this is not an animal shelter but rather a cage-free, home-based setting for the animals, space is at a premium. Please check that you have the veterinary records for your cat, and prepare yourself to make a contribution toward the cat’s ongoing care and food costs.

The Following Step:

Visit the National Website for Persian Rescues By Location, which may be found at the following address: http://purebredcatbreedrescue.org/persian_rescues.htm. There will be a list of Rescuers in your region available to you. There is also a Yahoo group email that you may join to communicate with a large number of other rescuers and prospective adopters. You are welcome to subscribe to that list and share pictures of your pet. Many individuals join this group to locate a cat and the Rescuers have been checked before the membership. You should still check references for any possible rescuer or adopter who offers to take your cat, just as you would check references for any potential new owner of your cat.

This list also features animal behaviorists, and vets, and a vast archive that may have some suggestions for finding a manner that you can truly retain your cat. On our “Links” tab, we have listed quite a few other Rescuers. It’s possible that there is one in your area. You will be responsible for providing transportation for your cat, in addition to paying a contribution toward the kitty’s overall care and food, and this is required of you. There are also Sanctuaries that will take in your cat for the rest of its life and give it love, three square meals, and medical care. If you are unable to keep your cat, you may find a sanctuary that will. These sanctuaries need a hefty gift, which STILL won’t even begin to cover the expense of caring for your cat medically or with the sort of food that has to be bought.

Final Step:

If you realize that you are out of time and are unable or unable to send your cat to a safe Rescue, please do some research on the local shelters in your area. In the vast majority of animal shelters throughout the United States, your cat will be in danger. Determine how long the shelter is willing to retain the cat before they kill it. Some will choose to end their lives within the next twenty-four hours.

There is NO such thing as a shelter that does not kill animals. Even if the cat just has a little illness like a cold, most shelters will put it to sleep nevertheless. It is still possible to locate an SPCA or low-kill shelter. A good many of them have tremendous success when it comes to placing Persians. You could look for shelters that are also adept at vetting prospective homes and give them a try. Some of them have connections with Rescue, and as a result, they will get in touch with them before putting the cat to sleep. Because there are times when we just do not have the space for the cat, we are unable to constantly bring it along.

IF YOU HAVE NO CHOICE BUT TO TAKE YOUR CAT TO THE SHELTER, PLEASE ASK THEM TO CALL RESCUE BEFORE THEY PUT THE CAT TO SLAUGHTER (killing it).

We have had multiple occasions when the persons who left the cat at the shelter told them we were full, so the shelter didn’t contact us. Their pet passed away when we might have helped rescue it by collaborating with that animal sanctuary. Even if the shelter assures you that they will contact Rescue, there is no guarantee that they really will. On several occasions, folks have left their cat at the shelter and been informed that Rescue would be contacted. When they checked back later, they discovered that their cat had been put to sleep.

Shelters with good placement records:

  • Napa County Animal Control will take out of area cats. They charge a small fee for the Surrender plus a minimal “out of area” fee.
  • Marin Humane. Will take cats from their own county.
  • San Francisco SPCA. 
  • Sacramento SPCA. Often VERY full but will take cats from owners.
  • Tri-City Animal Shelter (Fremont, Newark & Union City).

If you are prepared to be resourceful and persistent in your efforts to help your cat, there is ALWAYS a way to make a miracle happen for your cat. Sadly, most individuals desire the simple way out. We would be more helpful but have discovered that frequently when we spend hours working on a rescue place for someone, they don’t follow through.

In doing so, we have neglected our own kitties, who are in desperate need of our time and attention, and we have worn ourselves out in the process. If we were to take your cat in, we would need a significant payment to cover the costs of boarding and medical treatment for the other cats in Rescue who would be displaced as a result of our doing so. Every cat we take to Rescue costs another animal its’ life. If you have more questions, please contact us.

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